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Rockstar Arizona to Celebrate Grand Re-Opening August 12

Rockstar Arizona Cheer, Tumbling & Dance, formerly Fyrestorm All-Star Cheer, is set to celebrate their new name and expansion at 10 am on August 12th in Suite C of the Mesquite Building at Santa Cruz Commerce Center. Ak-Chin Indian Community Chair Robert Miguel and Mayor Christian Price will be on hand to share congratulations with owner, Beth Mundell, and to assist with the ribbon-cutting.

Prior to the ribbon-cutting, Rockstar Arizona will offer a free public tumbling clinic from 9-10 am. Following the ribbon-cutting, championship cheerleader and coach known for competing at the Cheerleading Worlds and Nfinity Legends, Rockstar Beatles Kennedy Thames, and Beatles Head Coach Scott Foster, will also be available for a meet and greet.

Rockstar Arizona’s programming encompasses co-ed, all-star, competitive, and recreational cheer and tumble for children 1 to 18 years old, as well as, classes for adults and those with special needs. Cheer programming involves dance, jumping, acrobatics, stunt-building and tumbling, which can showcase solos, duos, group stunt and partner stunt. Rockstar all-star teams have divisions for tiny, mini, youth, junior, and senior levels 1-5. In addition, there is an all-star hip hop program, which features teams and individuals. In addition, the program emphasizes character-building and self-confidence. “We want our athletes to be around good role models that will make them good human beings,” said Mundell.

Since its opening, the program has grown from an enrollment of about 65 to 100 athletes and from six to 21 staff members who include a number of specialists. “We coach a little differently,” Mundell said. “Rather than having coaches that generalize in a lot of areas. We have co-ed specialists, dance specialists, tumbling specialists, etcetera. We focus on family and that’s why we’re about half as expensive as other gyms.” In her new expanded space in Suite C of the Mesquite Building, Mundell expects to accommodate up to 200 athletes.

To find out more about Rockstar Arizona’s classes and programs, visit rockstararizona.com or call 856-624-3375.

Fyrestorm All-Star Cheer Jumps at Chance to Expand; Change Name to Rockstar Arizona

Four years ago, Fyrestorm All-Star Cheer was just a dream of tumbling and cheer coach, Beth Mundell. But with an assist from the Ak-Chin Industrial Park Board, Mundell was able to make her dream a reality when she opened her business in August 2013 in Suite E of the Mesquite Building at Ak-Chin’s Santa Cruz Commerce Center. Now Mundell is cheering her gym’s expansion under a new name: Rockstar Arizona.

The Fyrestorm program quickly gained prominence and for the last two years in a row, Fyrestorm athletes were invited to compete at The Summit – All Star Cheerleading Championship, which according to Mundell “is like the Super Bowl of cheer.” Now to further promote Mundell’s gym as the only local, Maricopa-based USASF-credentialed cheer and tumbling program with USASF and USAG-credentialed coaches, Mundell agreed to license the Rockstar Cheer & Dance name since it is recognized in cheer circles across the nation. “We are still an independently owned and operated family business,” Mundell emphasized.

Rockstar Arizona’s programming encompasses co-ed, all-star, competitive, and recreational cheer and tumble for children 1 to 18 years old, as well as, classes for adults and those with special needs. Cheer programming involves dance, jumping, acrobatics, stunt-building and tumbling, which can showcase solos, duos, group stunt and partner stunt. Rockstar all-star teams have divisions for tiny, mini, youth, junior, and senior levels 1-5. In addition, there is an all-star hip-hop program, which features teams and individuals. In addition, the program emphasizes character-building and self-confidence. “We want our athletes to be around good role models that will make them good human beings,” said Mundell.

Since its opening, the program has grown from an enrollment of about 65 to 100 athletes and from six to 21 staff members who include a number of specialists. “We coach a little differently,” Mundell said. “Rather than having coaches that generalize in a lot of areas. We have co-ed specialists, dance specialists, tumbling specialists, etcetera. We focus on family and that’s why we’re about half as expensive as other gyms.” In her new expanded space in Suite C of the Mesquite Building, Mundell expects to accommodate up to 200 athletes.

To find out more about Rockstar Arizona’s classes and programs, visit rockstararizona.com or call 856-624-3375. Watch for their Grand Re-Opening announcement, coming soon!

Commerce Center Welcomes Arp Custom Farming, LLC.

The Ak-Chin Industrial Park Board is pleased to welcome Arp Custom Farming to Suite D of the Mesquite Building in the Santa Cruz Commerce Center.

Owned by Gator and Ashley Arp, Arp Custom Farming uses the latest technology to provide innovative planting, tillage and harvesting services for local farmers in the western Pinal County area. A fourth generation farmer and grandson of early Maricopa leaders, Sonny and Dode Dunn, Gator grew up in the family business in Maricopa. Now he uses non-conventional methods in his farming services to maximize efficiency and yield.

The company will use the suite primarily as an administrative location. “I do most of my work now in the Maricopa, Casa Grande, Stanfield and Eloy areas,” said Gator. “This location is ideal to better serve my clients.”

To find out more about the services of Arp Custom Farming, call 480-802-1551.

Understanding Tribal Differences Needed for Successful Development

For many reasons, developing a project on reservation land is different than it is elsewhere.

When non-Native American developers consider land deals, decisions for the best use of the land are routinely determined by the use that offers the best financial return. When Native Americans consider a lease, investment or land use decision, they typically view it as interconnected with life that has physical, economic, social and spiritual implications, and all of these impacts must be carefully weighed.

This interconnectedness, known as “seven-generation thinking” is how Native American people are taught to think about their long-term sustainability —about making decisions that ensure that their land, air, and water can support all forms of life for seven generations to come. While each American Indian tribe is unique, most tribal people believe there is a responsibility to be considered in balance the with the economic opportunity.

While this is a sacred philosophy for most Native people, most non-Native businesses are not prepared to evaluate decisions from this multifaceted perspective. Generally, more thought, deliberate discussion and due diligence are required to close a deal with a tribal government or Native American business than for a business transaction off reservation.

Not surprisingly, many non-Native American businesspeople may misinterpret this extended decision-making period as inefficiency. For Native Americans, however, this is essential to developing a truly viable seven-generation economy.

The use of tribal land is further complicated by its legal status. Title to tribal lands is held in trust by the federal government. Trust status gives tribal governments the ability to exercise sovereign authority within their boundaries and are not generally subject to state laws. However, trust status also creates limitations on the use of these lands, and most actions affecting the land must comply with federal law.

Another factor complicating the development process is how the land is held in trust. Tribal land can be held either wholly by the tribal community or through a combination of tribal jurisdiction and individual tribal landowners that received a land allotment. When allotted land is involved, even a 10-acre parcel can mean 200-300 individuals need to approve a development deal, adding to the complexity of the development process.

Another Native American tradition that makes doing business different on tribal land is that most tribal communities are communal, and decisions are made with the consensus of the membership, often after long and deliberate discussions. The effort to reach consensus requires that a tribal government reach out to tribe members and bring them into the decision-making process.

This is very different from how decisions are made by city councils, where municipal and county governments decide the land use after listening to planners, lawyers or lobbyists. If residents object, they have to find their own way into the decision-making process.

In addition to the philosophical and land ownership issues, tribes vary widely in their development experience and sophistication. Some have a design review process and standards in place that allows them to move a project through the necessary steps with efficiency. Others lack appropriate tax and zoning codes necessary to facilitate smooth development of any commercial project.

Also, many tribes lack the capital to provide needed infrastructure, such as water, power, and sewage. Consequently, developers may need to include the cost of infrastructure build-out in their cost analysis. The Ak-Chin Indian Community’s industrial park is one of the exceptions. Santa Cruz Commerce Center, which has all of its infrastructure in place, is the only Arizona Native American tribal location to be Gold Certified as a shovel-ready site by the Arizona Commerce Authority.

While doing business on tribal land may be different, successful projects can generate rewards both on and off the reservation in job creation, reduced poverty, and shared resources. Understanding the differences goes a long way in creating success.

Tillers Tool Rentals & Sales Fills Gap of Shuttered Casa Grande Tool Rental Businesses

Do you live in Casa Grande and have discovered that both High Grade and Horizon Tool Rentals & Sales have closed? Good thing that our tenant, Tillers Equipment & Tool Rental & Sales, is just a short jaunt down the Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway to the Mesquite Building in the Santa Cruz Commerce Center.

Tillers is a family-owned business that not only serves the city of Maricopa, but also the city of Casa Grande and surrounding municipalities by providing some of the lowest prices in tool rentals, tool sales, and tool repairs. You’ll find leading brands of outdoor and indoor power equipment including air compressors and air tools, lawn mowers, line trimmers, edgers, generators, garden equipment, pressure washers, ladders, edgers, drills, and more for both commercial and residential needs–all clean, inspected and ready to go before you pick it up. Ask if your area qualifies for Tillers free equipment pickup and delivery.

Tillers also has a full line of Penske trucks available for lease. Call 520-568-2009 for more information or to make your reservation today.